Goldiharvey and the Three Bears

Once upon a time there was a little boy named Goldiharvey.

One day Goldiharvey was kicked out of his house because he tried to flush the cat down the toilet. He was told to not come home until dinnertime.

So Goldiharvey decided he would take a walk in the woods.

As he tripped along through the forests he stepped on flowers and kicked small animals. It was a beautiful day.

Soon after he kicked his fourth chipmunk, he rounded a bend in the forest path and saw before him a small wooden house. “What a nice house,” said Goldiharvey. “I hope nobody’s home.”

He walked up to the door and knocked politely. No one answered.

He knocked again, louder. No one answered.

He kicked in the door.

No one was home.

“I wonder if there’s any food in this house?” said Goldiharvey. “It’s been a whole hour since I’ve eaten.”

He looked in the refrigerator. There was nothing there but bones. He ripped off the refrigerator door and kicked the bones around.

He looked in the cupboards. There was nothing there but bones. He ripped off the cupboard doors and kicked the bones around.

Then he glanced at the kitchen table. There on the table were three bowls of porridge–a great big bowl, a middle-sized bowl, and a little baby bowl–freshly made and ready to be eaten.

He went first to the great big bowl of porridge, for he had a big appetite. He took a bite. “Yuck!” he said. “This is awful!” And he threw the bowl of porridge at the wall.

Then he went to the middle-sized bowl of porridge. He took a bite. “Yuck!” he said. “This is awful too!” And he threw the bowl of porridge at the wall.

Then he went to the little baby bowl and took a bite. “Yuck!” he said. “This is terrible too! Doesn’t anyone around here know how to make porridge?” And he picked up the bowl and threw it at the wall.

Now all the throwing had made him tired. He looked around for a place to sit down.

There in the living room he saw three chairs. A great big chair, a middle-sized chair, and a little baby chair.

He first tried to sit in the big chair. “Yuck,” said Goldiharvey. “This chair is way too hard!” He picked it up and threw it through a great big window.

Then he sat in the middle-sized chair. “Yuck,” he said. “This chair is way too soft!” He picked it up and threw it through a middle-sized window.

Then he sat in the little baby chair. “Yuck,” he said. “This chair is way too little! Only a baby could fit in it!” He picked up the little baby chair and threw it through a little baby window.

Now this throwing had made him very tired. He looked around to see if there was some comfortable place to lie down. There was not.

But he did see some stairs that led up to a second floor. He went up them, hoping that he would find a bed there.

He did. The stairs led to a bedroom. In the bedroom were three beds: a great big bed, a middle-sized bed, and a little baby bed.

He first lay down on the great big bed. “Yuck!” said Goldiharvey. “This bed is much too hard!” And he picked it up and threw it out the bedroom window.

Then he lay down on the middle-sized bed. “Yuck!” he said. “This bed is much too soft! I hate soft beds!” He picked up the middle-sized bed and threw it out the window.

Then he lay down on the little baby bed. “Yuck,” he said. “This bed is so small I can’t even stretch out.” And he picked it up and threw it out the bedroom window.

Just then the bedroom door burst open. “WHO’S BEEN THROWING BEDS OUT OF MY WINDOW!” growled a deep voice.

Before Goldiharvey could jump out of the bedroom window and escape, a huge paw grabbed him, then another one. Goldiharvey was lifted high in the air.

Then the big papa bear, who had just come home from a walk with his wife and baby, and was very upset to find his furniture and windows broken, ate Goldiharvey in one bite–except for Goldiharvey’s left leg, which he gave to the Mama bear, and for Goldiharvey’s right leg, which he gave to the Baby bear.

And they all lived happily ever after, except for Goldiharvey, who was dead.

Moral: Don’t be bad, or someday a bear will eat you.

About rockcanyon

Rick Walton has worked as a cook in a Mexican restaurant, a secretary, a missionary, an arts administrator, a school teacher, and a computer software writer and designer. But now he has the best job of all–writing for children. He is the author of over eighty books for children. His works include joke books, picture books, a collection of poetry, activity books, a play, mini-mysteries, and educational software. He loves to read, travel, play the guitar, study foreign languages, and write. Rick graduated from Brigham Young University in Spanish, with a Portuguese minor. His wife, Ann, is a computer programmer who has worked for IBM, Novell, and WordPerfect, and who nows works for Rick. They have five children. They live in a hodge-podge house on a secluded lot with a thousand trees, in the shadow of the Rocky Mountains. View all posts by rockcanyon

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