Frankenstein and the three Bears

One morning, as Frankenstein was stomping through the forest, knocking down trees and stepping on small animals, (but accidentally, of course, since deep down inside, Frankenstein is very kind), he came to a little house.

Frankenstein was curious to know who lived there.  He loved to make friends.  Maybe the people who lived in this little house would be his friends.

Frankenstein knocked on the door.

The door fell in.

Frankenstein looked inside.  He could see no one.

He picked up the door.  There was no one underneath.

Frankenstein squeezed into the little house.

There on the table he saw three bowls of porridge.  “Yum!” he said.  “Frankenstein hungry!”

He picked up the little bowl and poured it down his throat.

“Yum!  Very hot!  Frankenstein like when porridge very hot!”

He picked up the littler bowl and poured it down his throat.

“Yum!  Very cold!  Frankenstein like when porridge very cold!”

He picked up the itsy bitsy bowl and poured it down his throat.

“Yum!  Just right!  Frankenstein like when porridge just right!”

Still no one had appeared.  Frankenstein saw three chairs.  He decided to sit and wait for someone to come home so he could be their friend.

He sat in the little chair.

CRASH!

“Little chair too weak,” said Frankenstein.  “Too bad.”

He sat in the littler chair.

CRASH!

“Littler chair too weak,” said Frankenstein.  “Too bad.”

He sat in the itsy bitsy chair.

CRASH!

“Itsy bitsy chair too weak,” said Frankenstein.  “Too bad.”

So he sat on the floor, where he waited…

…and waited…

…and waited…

…and waited.

“Frankenstein not like waiting.  Frankenstein see what else is in house.  After all, this house belong to Frankenstein’s friends.  They won’t mind.”

Frankenstein went upstairs.  There he found three beds.

He lay down in the little bed.

It sunk all the way to the floor.

“Little bed too soft,” said Frankenstein.

He lay down in the littler bed.

It sunk all the way to the floor.

“Littler bed too soft,” said Frankenstein.

He lay down in the itsy bitsy bed.

It sunk all the way to the floor.

“Itsy bitsy bed too soft,” said Frankenstein.  “If bed going to sink to floor, Frankenstein might as well lay on floor.”

And he did.  He lay on the floor and looked at the ceiling.  The ceiling was made of wood.  In the wood were funny looking knots.  The knots looked like Frankenstein when he was a baby.

Just then the door opened.  “WHO’S BEEN SLEEPING IN MY…” said a voice.  Frankenstein looked.  There was a little daddy bear.  Next to the little daddy bear was a littler mommy bear.  And next to the littler mommy bear was an itsy bitsy baby bear.

“Hi,” said Frankenstein.  “Will you be my…”

“AAAAAAAYYYYYYYY!!!!!” said the three bears, and they turned, dashed down the stairs, and raced out of the house.

“Oh dear,” said Frankenstein.  “Maybe they forget something.”  And he lay back down to wait.

He waited…

…and waited…

…and waited…

…and waited…

…but the three bears never returned.

About rockcanyon

Rick Walton has worked as a cook in a Mexican restaurant, a secretary, a missionary, an arts administrator, a school teacher, and a computer software writer and designer. But now he has the best job of all–writing for children. He is the author of over eighty books for children. His works include joke books, picture books, a collection of poetry, activity books, a play, mini-mysteries, and educational software. He loves to read, travel, play the guitar, study foreign languages, and write. Rick graduated from Brigham Young University in Spanish, with a Portuguese minor. His wife, Ann, is a computer programmer who has worked for IBM, Novell, and WordPerfect, and who nows works for Rick. They have five children. They live in a hodge-podge house on a secluded lot with a thousand trees, in the shadow of the Rocky Mountains. View all posts by rockcanyon

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